Monday, April 23, 2012

Say, whaaaaaaaat? (re my lifestyle, levi style)

I must decide:

Caribbean till next Wednesday (May 2, 10th of Iyar), Los Angeles till a week and a half later (May 14, 22nd of Iyar), Colorado for 5 weeks (June 18, 28th of Sivan), something for a month and a half (maybe Los Angeles, or Portland, or New York or Los Cabos or Leeds or anywhere else), go to Oslo in August till Yom Kippur, England for Sukkos and on...

OR

Caribbean till Los Angeles till Shavuos and then Philippppppppppppines for 5 weeks, and then onto Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand and prapps more...

It's just too hard to decide...!

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

 

Duets


On the other side of ecstasy lies a painful emptiness. On the other side of bitterness lies joy. Where one goes, the other must follow.

In the ecstasy of understanding lies the gnawing pain of a new frontier of ignorance.

In the agony of yearning lies the ecstasy of love.

In the ecstasy of prayer lies the agony of smallness and distance before the infinite light.

There is no sweet song that is not equally bitter, save that which is shallow and meaningless.

He formed His world from delight, and so must share in its bitterness. Until the time when darkness will shine.


 


From the wisdom of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, of righteous memory; words and condensation by Rabbi Tzvi Freeman.

Sunday, April 15, 2012

Q. Why is the holiday of Passover routinely called "Pesach" by observant Jews?

A. Because they "pay a sach" for it.



Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Thanks, Gd, For My White Slipper Boots

Thanks, Gd, for my white slipper boots that match so perfectly with the white writing on my orange sweatshirt.

Thanks for the book about the Israeli army that kept me up these past two nights.

Thanks for my two brothers coming home tomorrow.

Thanks for the bucket of carrots that I'm about to wash, peel and wash again.

Thanks for the "One Minute of Torah" Book that turned out so beautifully.

Thanks for the miracles You perform.

Thanks for my friend who is happily married.

Thanks for the Lonely Planet book on my desk. And thanks for leading me closer and closer to the day I plan on packing it with me.

Thanks for the background photo on my IPod- a snapshot of my itinerary.

Thanks for Rutima and Auntie Nechama.

Thanks, Gd, for giving me humour and for giving me sensitivity.

Thanks for my published articles.

Thanks for these days of sleeping in.

Thanks for my short hair cut so beautifully.

And, thanks for listening ;)

Monday, April 02, 2012

Southeast Asia Visa Requirements for US Passport Holders

Different Visa Requirements per Country in Southeast Asia

By , About.com Guide
Southeast Asia is generally open to US citizens, with different degrees of visa-free access throughout the region.
Most countries in Southeast Asia allow fairly easy visa-free entry, or visa upon arrival, for stays ranging from two weeks to three months. The only exception is Vietnam, which requires US passport holders to get prior visa approval at a Vietnamese Embassy or Consulate.
So if you're planning to hop from country to country in Southeast Asia, be sure you're prepared long beforehand with the proper requirements, so you don't hit a wall at the immigration gate.

Cambodia

From CIA World Factbook. Public domain.
US passport holders may obtain a visa on arrival; just provide $20 and a passport-size photo. Your visa will let you stay on for a maximum of one month. Cambodia also offers a slightly more expensive, but vastly more convenient, Cambodia e-Visa that you can apply for online. For more information on getting a Cambodia visa, read this article: Cambodia Travel Information
 

Indonesia

From CIA World Factbook. Public domain.
US passport holders may get a visa on arrival, with a fee that depends on how long you plan to stay (30 day maximum). For more information, read this article: Indonesia Travel Information

Laos

From CIA World Factbook. Public domain.
Visa on arrival for US passport holders may be purchased for $35; maximum 30 days' stay.

Malaysia

From CIA World Factbook. Public domain.
US passport holders visiting Malaysia need not get a visa if visiting for social, business or academic purposes. Visitors can stay, visa-free, for a maximum of three months. For more information, read this article: Malaysia Travel Information

Myanmar

Image from the Open Clip Art Library, released into the public domain.
US passport holders must obtain pre-approval for a visa from the nearest Myanmar embassy or mission. For more information, read this article: Myanmar Visa - Entry Requirements and How to Get Your Visa for Myanmar. More general information also available here: Myanmar Travel Information

Philippines

From CIA World Factbook. Public domain.
US passport holders may enter without a visa, for stays not exceeding 21 days. Visa Extensions can be obtained from Philippine Embassies, Philippine Consulates, or from the Bureau of Immigration within the Philippines. For more information, read this article: Philippines Travel Information

Singapore

From CIA World Factbook. Public domain.
US passport holders are not required to obtain a visa to visit Singapore; the Entry Pass permits a maximum stay 30 days. For more information, read this article: Singapore Travel Information

Thailand

From CIA World Factbook. Public domain.
US passport holders can get a stamp on arrival, permitting them to stay for up to 30 days. A single 14-day extension may be obtained. For more information, read this article: Thailand Travel Information
 

Vietnam

From CIA World Factbook. Public domain.
US passport holders must obtain pre-approval for visa from the nearest Vietnamese Embassy. For more information, read this article: Vietnam Visa. More general information also available here: Vietnam Travel Information